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Objections Continue to Latest Design for St. Thomas Church Project

Objections Continue to Latest Design for St. Thomas Church Project

Developers may have to continue to scale back the size of the proposed St. Thomas church/condo project at 1772 Church St. NW to get community buy-in from neighbors and members of the Dupont Advisory Neighborhood Commission more than a year after they first presented plans for the new development.

A team from CAS Riegler presented a set of updated plans Tuesday to the ANC’s  Zoning Preservation and Development committee that highlighted several changes from the last presentation in December, including sculpting the Church Street facade of the residential building to make it appear more like the neighborhood’s townhouses.

But neither developers nor community members could see eye-to-eye on what has become a sticking point in the project’s 13-month design process: The overall height and mass of the residential complex. The project is still too large, residents and commissioners said.

Find the full set of plans here. 

The seven-story residential building and adjoining new church for St. Thomas Episcopal Church has shrunk by approximately 8,000 square feet since its first iteration in February 2013, developers told the ANC in December.

On Tuesday, developers outlined several other changes they said made the site fit more easily into the neighborhood. Much of the site’s layout had flipped: Boxier parts of the building had shifted toward the alley side of the building and away from Church Street, and additional setbacks at the fifth story reduced visibility of  a seventh-level penthouse by 50 feet. The church entrance, previously in the middle of 18th street, was moved to the corner of 18th and Church streets to preserve more green space.

A drawing from Cas Riegler shows reduced visibility of the residential penthouse from Church Street.

A drawing from Cas Riegler shows reduced visibility of the residential penthouse from Church Street.

Other new details: The church will be mostly stone and glass, veiled by thin pieces of terracotta in varying shades of gray. The residential building will be mostly brick, with shading to mimic the street’s townhomes. And parking access would be restricted to 18th Street.

“We feel like we’ve addressed a majority of concerns … but there are some concerns that are going to remain unanswered for a project of this size and complexity,” developer Nick Jesse said.

But neighbors said most of what appeared to be reductions in mass had been re-introduced elsewhere in the project. Likewise, the maximum height has remained steady at 70 feet, despite requests to make the development smaller.

Residents were also unhappy with some of what they called misleading renderings: A townhouse abutting the proposed residential building on Church Street, for instance, appeared four to five stories tall in a rendering from last fall, but in the new renderings on Tuesday, was drawn to appear as six.

Likewise, a map that showed the heights of buildings in the half dozen blocks surrounding the church showed several buildings standing 80 feet or higher in the neighborhood. But many of them are located along Connecticut and Massachusetts avenues, members of the Church Street Neighbors group said: Since the Dupont Circle Overlay was established in 1992, only four new buildings 80 feet or more have been built. Two of them were planned unit developments–which require greater oversight and a community benefits agreement–they said.

A Cas Riegler map of building height in the neighborhood surrounding St. Thomas.

A Cas Riegler map of building height in the neighborhood surrounding St. Thomas.

“We aren’t being unreasonably intransigent,” said Pennie Ojeda of the Church Street Neighbors, adding that several of the changes developers presented were not responsive to October comments from the Historic Preservation Review Board.

Commissioner Justine Underhill proposed supporting the project ahead of the ANC meeting with a few recommendations, including a height limit of 59 feet.

“Fifty-nine feet is a non-viable project,” developer Robin Bettarel  told the commissioners, to which one quipped there “might not be a way to be viable in a historic district.”

Bettarel said she was frustrated that they couldn’t move beyond what seemed to be the concerns of a small group of people.

“I dont’ feel like we’ve been allowed to be heard,” she said. “It feels like we’re being attacked.”

Underhill said she’d gone door to door to piece together recommendations for developers—including a request for a traffic study as well as one for developers to continue to work with the ANC before they apply for zoning relief—as everyone tries to move the project forward.

“[Tonight]‘s process is really for the community to have a voice, and that is what I’m doing,” Underhill said.

The committee did not vote on the precise height or language for their resolution during the meeting. Prior to the full ANC meeting next week they will likely agree on language that requests a development smaller in size, which may include specific recommendations on height limit or another measure of mass.

 

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Featured Properties by Lindsay Reishman Real Estate

Capital Bikeshare Rates to Increase May 1

Capital Bikeshare Rates to Increase May 1

Capital Bikeshare, the bike sharing service that allows residents and visitors to rent bikes as annual members or daily riders, will increase its rates effective May 1, the company announced Wednesday. Annual memberships will increase from $75 to $85; casual rider daily membership rates will increase from $7 to $8 for one-day rentals and from $15 to $17 for three-day rentals.

The rate hike–the first since the system launched more than four years ago–will cover increased operating costs and system expansion, the company explained in a blog post.

When Capital Bikeshare first launched in the D.C. region in September 2010, there were 114 stations in the District and Arlington County, Va. Since 2010, the bikesharing service has expanded to the City of Alexandria, Va. and Montgomry County, Md. and added more than 200 new stations.

The increased fare will come with new benefits:

“Capital Bikeshare will also be able to implement new techniques to improve the availability of bikes and empty docks at stations, otherwise known as “rebalancing.” This will include experimentation with bike corrals in high-ridership areas during peak usage hours, improved data analysis for operations management, and future expansion of the system to underserved regions of the Capital Bikeshare service area.”

Want to avoid the price hike? You can renew your annual membership at the rate of $75 until April 30, no matter when it would normally expire.

Capital Bikeshare price change chart from March 2015, effective May 1, 2015. Image courtesy of Capital Bikeshare.

Capital Bikeshare price change chart from March 2015, effective May 1, 2015. Image courtesy of Capital Bikeshare.

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Madison to Break Ground on Logan Circle Condo in July

Madison to Break Ground on Logan Circle Condo in July

Madison Investments’ plans for a new 32-unit condo building on an empty lot at 1427-1429 Rhode Island Ave. NW cleared a remaining hurdle to development recently when the developer came to an agreement to purchase the air rights over the driveway of the neighboring Zenith Condominium. The project team tells District Source they anticipate breaking ground in July and delivering by September 2016.

Madison proposes an 8-story, 32-unit condo building for the mid-block lots sandwiched between two existing residential buildings. The property will offer a mixture of one-, two- and three-bedroom units. The project team with designs by PGN Architects received concept approval from the Historic Preservation Review Board in April 2014 and will work with historic staff as they pick materials for the project within the 14th Street Historic District.

Local blog Short Articles about Long Meetings first reported on the  air rights agreement:

“Barry Madani of Madison Investments told a committee of Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 2F/Logan Circle that his company had reached a deal with the board of the Zenith Condominium (1437 Rhode Island Avenue) which will allow Madison to build a part of a seven-story condominium over the Zenith’s driveway.”

The agreement with the Zenith condo to take over the air rights triggered a public space application process in which the developers must request the existing curb cut that allows cars to access the driveway can continue to exist. The ANC 2F Community Development Committee voted unanimously to recommend that the full ANC support the curb cut request and send a letter to the District Department of Transportation stating as much.

Omeade Hekmat, a development manager for Madison Investments, told District Source the curb cut was a technicality that he expects to square away by the end of March and that the developers will move forward with the permitting process in the months to come.

Madison is calling the new development the Elysium Logan.

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Reservation 13 Development Marks Bowser’s First LDA Signing

Mayor Muriel Bowser (center) signs the land disposition agreement for a portion of Reservation 13 with Chris Donatelli (left) and Scottie Irving (right).

Mayor Muriel Bowser (center) signs the land disposition agreement for a portion of Reservation 13 with Chris Donatelli (left) and Scottie Irving (right).

Mayor Muriel Bowser signed her first land disposition agreement (LDA) Monday at the Wilson Building, officially handing over two Reservation 13 lots of on top of and adjacent to the Stadium Armory Metro to Donatelli and Blue Skye development companies. The developers will build a mixed-use project with more than 350 residential units–30% of which will be affordable–and at least 20,000 square feet of retail in Hill East.

“Today is indeed a great day for Hill East,” said Bowser, calling the project “catalytic” for the neighborhood.

The project highlighted Monday is just a small portion of the entire Hill East District Waterfront (Reservation 13), which is comprised of 67 acres.

As many of the speakers at the LDA signing noted, the site’s redevelopment has been “a long time coming.” More than twelve years, in fact.

The Council first approved funds for the master planning process in 2002. The Fenty administration released a request for proposals for redevelopment in 2008 that received four responses, but the economy took a turn and all but one group, Donatelli Development and Blue Skye Development, dropped out. In 2012 the Gray administration re-released a requests for expression of interest for the site for legal reasons and received one response again from Donatelli Development and Blue Skye Development. 

Under the terms of the LDA the developers will not pay for the land in exchange for their commitment to provide 30% affordable housing, totaling about 106 units.

Bowser said the Donatelli/Blue Skye project “represents the first step in the entire redevelopment in Hill East.”

When asked if she has concrete plans or a timeline for an RFP for other portions of the Hill East District, Bowser was cautious in her response. She said she hopes the success of this project, expected to deliver in 2018, will encourage other investment in the area.

Bowser said her administration will wait until the time is right for a new solicitation–a time that will be determined both by outreach from her administration to the development community and expressed interest from developers in other sites.

During a February Kingman Park and Rosedale community meeting, Councilwoman Yvette Alexander told residents the Donatelli site would bring a grocer to the site at Stadium Armory, though at an October meeting about the project Larry Clark, vice president of Donatelli Development, said conversations with a grocer had stalled.  Clark indicated in October that the grocer might require as much as 60,000 square feet of ground floor retail space; Monday, Chris Donatelli said the project would offer 20,000 square feet of retail between two buildings, suggesting a large grocer is no longer in the works.

Donatelli is no stranger to metro-oriented development. The developers have built five metro station projects in the D.C. area., including Park Place at Georgia Avenue in Petworth and the Ellington on U Street.

View of the future development at Reservation 13 as seen from 19th Street with the Stadium Armory Metro at the northwest corner of the project. Image from DMPED documents.

View of the future development at Reservation 13 as seen from 19th Street with the Stadium Armory Metro at the northwest corner of the project. Image from DMPED documents.

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378 New Apartments Now Leasing on H Street, NE

378 New Apartments Now Leasing on H Street, NE

Station House, a new  378-unit apartment building located at 701 2nd St. NE, has begun leasing its mixture of studios, one-, two- and three-bedroom units walking distance to Union Station and the H Street corridor.  The development by Fisher Brothers and Mack-Cali begins leasing today through Roseland, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Mack-Cali. Station House is located on H Street.

 “Station House, located across the street from Union Station and the Metro, is the ideal apartment lifestyle, aesthetically rich with Rockwell’s design and our indoor and outdoor amenities that surpass expectation. While we believe our residents will appreciate the access to Capitol Hill, NoMa and more, they will be even more proud to come home to the Atlas District,” said Winston Fisher, partner at Fisher Brothers, in a press release.

The units feature interior designs by New York-based Rockwell Group, known for its work in luxury hospitality. Station House is the Rockwell Group’s first residential project in the DC area.

Residents have access to amenities like community gardens, a harvest table, a tasting and demonstration kitchen and a 6,200 square-foot fitness center with spin and yoga studios. The rooftop boasts a pool, hot tub, cabanas and grilling stations.

In addition to its proximity to several bus lines, two metro stations and the future streetcar line, Station House offers a 309-spot, secure underground parking garage for residents with cars.

For leasing information, you may visit Station House’s website www.stationhousedc.com or call 844-LIVE SH. 

Lobby image credit Ira Wexler Photography.

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Friends Lodging Facility Faces Foe in DC Tax Office

The rooming accommodations at the William Penn House on Capitol Hill. Image from the Hill Rag courtesy of the William Penn House.

The rooming accommodations at the William Penn House on Capitol Hill. Image from the Hill Rag courtesy of the William Penn House.

This article originally appeared in The Hill Rag‘s March issue, available in newsstands now.

The William Penn House (WPH), which has operated in a 1917 rowhouse at 515 East Capitol St. SE as  a Quaker center on Capitol Hill since 1966, faces the prospect of losing its tax exempt status and with it the ability to fulfill its religious mission in Washington.

The WPH provides hostel-style lodging to religious and social justice groups as well as individuals.

The property has until recently qualified for tax exempt status under a provision applicable to “[b]uildings belonging to religious corporations or societies primarily and regularly used for religious worship, study, training, and missionary activities[.]“

The problem at hand for the Friends’ house on the Hill is that the D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue (OTR) revoked the organization’s tax exempt status for a portion of the property that OTR determined is not being used for religious purposes. OTR issued a tax bill for the portion of the property that offers lodging.

“The William Penn House has a certificate of occupancy authorizing both rooming house and religious uses within the property. In October 2014, OTR issued a letter revoking the exemption on only that portion of the property used by the public for lodging, as such use is analogous to hotel use and as such cannot be exempt; the partial revocation was effective April 2014. That letter preserved the exemption for the portion of the property used for religious purposes,” wrote David Umansky, the public affairs officer for the Office of the Chief Financial Officer, in an email.

But as far as the William Penn House is concerned, offering lodging is part of its religious mission.

“We’re probably the most effective outreach for Quakers in the United States” said Byron Sandford who runs WPH.

The house, in addition to lodging, offers religious services daily for all guests, Quaker or not, and also keeps an extensive library of books relevant to the Quaker faith for guests to read at their leisure.

The majority of the room bookings are for groups, nearly all of which are in Washington for education, service, advocacy or religious purposes, according to data on guests from the last three years. In 2014, 70% of bookings were from groups.

Sandford said their lodgings are simple, another tenet of Quaker faith, with groups and individuals sharing rooms with as many as 10 bunk beds. With rates at about $50 per person per night, the funds from the lodgings do not cover the property’s operating expenses. In any given year, Sandford estimates that 20 to 30% of the WPH income is from donations.

“I’m kind of baffled that their tax-exempt is being questioned because this is a place that without non-profit status, I don’t think could continue. It’s not a profit-making concern,” said Barry Crosno, general secretary of the Friends General Conference (FGC), an association of regional Quaker organizations in the United States and Canada.

WPH caters to groups coming to Washington by allowing groups to book as far out as two years in advance. If there are leftover spaces not used by groups, then the beds are made available to individuals no more than two months in advance of a stay.

Part of the tax issue for WPH is that the facility allows individual bookings through a booking service called Hostel World. The organization does not have the capacity to have a staff member dedicated to booking space and relies on Hostel World as a low-fee option to process a portion of its individual guests.

WPH first began its conversation with OTR about its tax exempt status in 2011 when a D.C. government exemption specialist questioned whether the lodging aspect of the William Penn House should qualify for an exemption or if it was a commercial endeavor, particularly citing the Hostel World booking listed on the facility’s website.

An attorney for WPH sent a response in 2011 arguing that the primary use of the William Penn House is for religious, charitable, educational and other purposes that qualify for tax exempt status. Sandford said after a few phone calls with the city government and assistance from the office of then-Councilman Tommy Wells it appeared that matter was settled. Between 2012 and 2014 WPH received no notice about its status as a tax-exempt organization being in question.

Then in October 2014 OTR sent a letter notifying WPH that its status was revoked effective April 2014 and that a tax bill would need to be paid.

OTR’s letter to Sandford points to the fact that lodgings are available to not just Quakers, but also “the general public” as a part of its argument that the William Penn House is acting as a hotel.

“It’s not like we just snuck this up on them” said Sandford, noting that both groups and individuals have been welcome to stay at the center since its inception in 1966.

Crosno of the FGC said limiting lodging to just Quakers, rather than welcoming groups and individuals from all walks of life goes against the very point of the William Penn House.

”One of the ways many Quakers believe you get to a more peaceful world is that people who are different from one another sit down and break bread together,” said Crosno. “To try and limit who stays there to Quakers actually doesn’t speak to what the religion itself is trying to promote in deed.”

Sandford takes it a step further, questioning whether OTR’s assumption about the Quaker religious mission is a violation of church and state.

“For them to define what is a spiritual venture I think goes against the First Amendment,” said Sandford.

The William Penn House has been working with the Office of Councilman Charles Allen to resolve its dispute with OTR. Allen said thus far the tax office has been holding firm with its findings that lodging does not fall within the WPH religious mission.

“We think it does align with their mission and it provides a public service on Capitol Hill and to the city,” said Allen. “I’d really like to see OTR come away with the same conclusion.”

Allen hopes his office, OTR and the Quaker center can find a way to resolve the tax question without necessitating new, site-specific legislation. The legislative option is a “last resort” said Allen.

“The urgency is going to have to come from us and the community and the William Penn House,” said Allen.

Sandford said the William Penn House may need to retain counsel to fully resolve the issue this time around. The organization does not have significant funds to pay for an attorney, but several have stepped forward offering pro bono work following other news reports about the tax challenge.

The William Penn House has until April to appeal OTR’s findings to the Superior Court of the District of Columbia, barring any other solutions.

See more from the Hill Rag online at: http://www.capitalcommunitynews.com/content/dc-threatens-put-william-penn-house-out-business#sthash.lZ43bnJf.dpuf

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JBG Purchases Akridge’s Fairgrounds Near Ballpark

The Fairgrounds venue on Half Street, SE near the Nationals Ballpark. Image by Flickr user danspix.

The Fairgrounds venue on Half Street, SE near the Nationals Ballpark. Image by Flickr user danspix.

JBG recently purchased the majority of Akridge’s  property near the National Ballpark that currently houses the Fairgrounds shipping container venue, according to the Capitol Riverfront Business Improvement District.

The site will likely be redeveloped into two new residential buildings with a significant retail presence. 

The Washington Business Journal reports Akridge will retain ownership of the norther one-third of the property, having sold the southern two-thirds closer to the ballpark to Akridge for $45 million. Akridge still plans to build an office building on its northern portion of the property facing M Street.

 

 

 

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Boys and Girls Club Disposition Process Narrows Re-development Options to 1

Rendering of the Dantes / Menkiti affordable senior housing redevelopment of the Eastern Branch Boys and Girls Club. Image from DGS presentations.

Rendering of the Dantes / Menkiti affordable senior housing redevelopment of the Eastern Branch Boys and Girls Club. Image from DGS presentations.

Though the Department of General Services (DGS) has not completed its review process for bids to redevelop the site of the Eastern Branch Boys and Girls Club on Capitol Hill, the agency’s requirements and lease terms have narrowed the field of interested and qualified developers to just one: Dantes / Menkiti. The Eastern Branch building, 261 17th St. SE, sits two blocks from the Stadium Armory Metro.

Capitol Hill community leaders have expressed their dissatisfaction with what they see as the limited nature of the terms of the request for proposals.

DGS sought a development partner willing to accept a 25-year lease (maximum of 50 years) for the property and the 30,000 square foot building currently on the site. Additionally, new restrictions from the District government require that any government property disposed of must have a minimum 30 percent affordable housing if housing is what is developed on the site. However, DGS indicated the District would not provide any public subsidy such as low-income housing tax credits or other financing mechanisms in support of the projects.

Two development teams presented their proposals to the community in January. The two options are a 100% market-rate senior housing proposal from Century Associates / Horizon Hill Ventures and a 100% affordable senior housing proposal from Dantes / Menkiti.

The Century Associates proposal would fit within the existing footprint of the building, bringing a total of 25 market-rate units plus two care-giver units in a range of sizes. The proposal also includes a potential partnership with Capitol Hill Village–an aging in place organization–and an indoor, fee-based play area for children.

In their presentation, Century Associates questioned the financial feasibility of any project developed to meet the terms set forth by DGS, citing the following issues:

  • Required lease structure adversely affects equity investor and lender interest
  • Only two respondents on what is otherwise a highly desirable site
  • Prohibition on applying any other public subsidy (i.e. HPTF subsidy, District LIHTC allocation, etc) reduces feasibility.

The Dantes / Menkiti proposal would bring 49, 1-bedroom units of affordable senior housing (46 affordable at 60% AMI, 3 affordable at 30% AMI) to the property, which would require a two-story addition. The development would also include 5,000 square feet of community space. During a community presentation when asked about the necessity of the two-story addition, the developers said the addition is what makes the low-income housing possible.

In a letter to ANC 6B Commissioners Brian Flahaven and Denise Krepp, DGS noted that Menkiti indicated their team is able to enter into a ground lease under the 25-50-year lease terms, and submitted a financial proforma indicating as much, but noted that Century continued to indicate their project cannot be financed with private funds under such restrictions. In short: Menkiti/Dantes is the last man standing.

In a blog post about the Best and Final Offer (BAFO) request from DGS,  Flahaven wrote he was “frustrated” by the limiting nature of the DGS process:

“Based on the BAFO response summary, it is pretty clear that DGS is down to one proposal for the site – Dantes/Menkiti. Instead of providing additional flexibility in the BAFO, DGS essentially doubled-down on their original RFP terms, including the ridiculously short lease requirement.”

DGS has not formally announced its selection, but will likely do so in March.

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H Street NE Buildings to be Razed for 28-unit Residential Project

H Street NE Buildings to be Razed for 28-unit Residential Project

The owners of 1402-1406 H St. NE have filed a request to raze three, two-story commercial buildings to make way for the proposed 28-unit residential project with ground floor retail at the triangular intersection of 14th Street, H Street and Florida Avenue, NE.

Mehari Sequar is developing the site with designs by PGN Architects into a mixed-use project, currently pending a final order of approval from the Board of Zoning Adjustment. The project, known as 1401 Florida Avenue, as proposed would not include any parking though 21 spots would typically be required for a building of its size.

Earlier in February the BZA moved to approve the requested relief from parking in particular noting the awkward size and shape of the site as a limit on the project team’s ability to create below-grade parking.

In the meantime the owners have filed for raze applications for the three buildings currently on the lot.

The brick building at 1402 H St. NE dates to 1892, according to historic property record filed with the raze application. When it was built it cost $2,000 and included both a storefront and a residential space. The cinderblock buildings at 1404-1406 were built together in 1938 each with a store and residential space for an estimated total cost of $7,000 at the time.

The raze application is in the hands of the the Historic Preservation Office for an administrative clearance.

1402-1406 H St. NE on the triangular lot (outlined in red). Image from Board of Zoning Adjustment case documents.

1402-1406 H St. NE on the triangular lot (outlined in red). Image from Board of Zoning Adjustment case documents.

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Massive M Street SE Development Approved at Zoning

Massive M Street SE Development Approved at Zoning

A four-phase development including three residential buildings with an estimated 673 residential units and more than 10,000 square feet of retail on the banks of the Anacostia Riverfront in Southeast Capitol Hill is closer to becoming a reality following the Zoning Commission’s unanimous approval Monday night for Phase 1.

The development by Cohen Siegel Investors with designs by GTM Architects will transform the riverfront area currently home to a lonely pair of office buildings at Maritime Plaza, several historic boathouses along the river and construction equipment staging areas. 

The nearly 3-acres site is bounded by M Street, a future Virginia Avenue and Water Street, SE.

The first phase entails a 10-story residential building with 218  rental units, an underground parking garage with 51 spaces and 44 surface parking spaces.

As part of the first phase, the developer will improve existing surface streets like M Street, construct an extension of Virginia Avenue south of M Street and create a new internal north-south private street.  Among the public benefits expected in the first phase are a public dog park at the southern terminus of 14th Street at the project and a wildflower meadow along the Water Street right- of-way to help with surface runoff and biodiversity.

A group of neighbors on the 1300 block of L Street objected to the height of the proposed project and the level of parking being provided–the entire project will bring about 221 parking spaces, a ratio closer to one parking space for every three units, though four to one is the standard requirement. The L Street residents also raised concerns about the impact of lighting from the new development on their block, which currently faces the relatively dark Southeast Freeway, the CSX railroad tracks and beyond that the riverfront.

The developers did not change their plans for parking of building height and submitted drawings showing the lighting impact that of the new development. In response to community concerns the developers agreed not to pursue a national chain restaurant for the ground floor retail  and to try to secure a small grocer for the space instead. The developers also committed that any soil– which posed concerns over environmental impacts–taken from the property during construction would not become part of the landfill for the proposed SE/SW Boulevard project.

The developers committed to filing for a  building permit for Phase 1 within 2 years of the final PUD approval and to beginning construction within 3 years of the final PUD approval.

View of proposed 1333 M St. SE development from L Street, SE at night. Image from Zoning Commission case records.

View of proposed 1333 M St. SE development from L Street, SE at night. Image from Zoning Commission case records.

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